April 21st, 2014
themodernworld

rollership:

with full sustaining resouces

(Source: lilightfoot)

April 21st, 2014
themodernworld

rollership:

Miguel Chevalier, Magic Carpet, (2014).

(Source: artruby)

April 20th, 2014
themodernworld
Reblogged from Futurescope
April 20th, 2014
themodernworld

border-studies:

Osteofutures

bravecadet:

Osteoid: 3D-printed cast concept that uses ultrasound to heal your bones 40% faster

Reblogged from Stowe Boyd
April 19th, 2014
themodernworld

good:

good:

Infographic: The Rise of Millennials Living at Home

A recent Pew Research analysis found that 21.6 million America’s young people—that’s 36 percent of Millennials (loosely categorized as those between the ages of 18 to 31)—live with their parents at home. With the highest percentage in at least four decades, the study attributed the rise to three major factors: declining employment, rising college enrollment, and declines in marriage rate. Click above to see how the changing trends in our society and economy are changing opportunities for Millennials.

Continue reading on good.is

GOOD Community members Elisa Huang and Tyler Hoehne contributed in Culture, Living and Economy

See mom, it’s a national trend! 

Reblogged from
April 18th, 2014
themodernworld

prostheticknowledge:

AgencyGlass

Bizarre proof-of-concept tech by Dr. Hirotaka Osawa are glasses with small displays that give attention to others around you.

The idea here is that we have technology to help us work in areas such as physical labour and brainwork, but not “emotional labour”, the social face-to-face aspects of job roles. Video embedded below:

From IEEE:

Have you ever had trouble concentrating in the office as people walk by and glance at you? Do you come off as unfriendly or aloof, when you’re really just focusing on your work?

Dr. Hirotaka Osawa from Tsukuba University, in Japan, has developed a new wearable device to help us with something called “emotional labor.” His idea is that people could adopt cyborg technology to increase the emotional comfort of those around us. In this case, the device is a crazy pair of glasses that display eyeballs on their lenses.

The device’s virtual eyes naturally follow people and movement, making it appear as though you’re friendly and approachable, even if you’re too busy doing something else or too tired to actually look friendly and approachable.

"This emotional support reduces a user’s cognitive load for social manners," Osawa says.

More Here

Reblogged from The New Aesthetic
April 18th, 2014
themodernworld

theatlantic:

Read This Article Again in 2064

For most daydreamers, predicting the future is a business of missing more than you hit.

For example, we still haven’t eliminated childbirth by inventing designer babies grown in artificial wombs, a prediction the science editor of LIFE magazine made 50 years ago. 

But that same editor surmised we’d be able to grow complete human organs from cell tissue in laboratories, and most Americans now agree that this sounds like something that will happen. Eighty-one percent of those polled believe organs will be developed in petri dishes by 2064. (Hey, why not, scientists are already working on lab-grown ears and noses.)

That’s according to a new Pew Research Center study that asked Americans for their feelings and predictions about the next 50 years of science.

But Americans’ optimism was not evenly distributed. If they were confident in the biomedical future, they were pessimistic about space. Only a third of us now believe that we’ll have colonized another planet by 2064. Here are nine other predictions Americans made.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Reblogged from The Atlantic
April 18th, 2014
themodernworld
Too many founders have sacrificed the WHY in the process of speeding up the WHAT and HOW.
Reblogged from 9-bits
April 18th, 2014
themodernworld

theatlantic:

Africa’s Tech Edge

How the continent’s many obstacles, from widespread poverty to failed states, allowed African entrepreneurs to beat the West at reinventing money for the mobile age

Read more. [Image: Mike McQuade]

Reblogged from The Atlantic
April 18th, 2014
themodernworld

joshbyard:

Google X Lab Files Patent for Contact Lens With Built-In Camera

Google has invented a new smart contact lens with an integrated camera. The camera would be very small and sit near the edge of the contact lens so that it doesn’t obscure your vision. By virtue of being part of the contact lens, the camera would naturally follow your gaze, allowing for a huge range of awesome applications, from the basis of a bionic eye system for blind and visually impaired people, through to early warning systems (the camera spots a hazard before your brain does), facial recognition, and superhuman powers (telescopic and infrared/night vision). 

(via Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come | ExtremeTech)

April 18th, 2014
themodernworld

theatlantic:

Why Don’t Older Americans Want Time Machines?

You want a time machine, don’t you?

Because one in 10 Americans do — at least that’s what they said when Pew Research Center asked what futuristic technology they would like to own.

That’s a notable percentage of people, especially when you consider that survey respondents came up with “time machine,” unprompted, out of every possible future invention they could imagine. (Naturally, flying cars were popular, too.)

The curious thing is that Pew found people’s level of interest in time travel had a lot to do with how old they are. About 11 percent of 30-to-49-year-olds said a time machine was the one futuristic device they’d want to own, but only 3 percent of people older than 65 said so. 

And looking across demographics of the entire study group, people under 50 were way more into time-travel than people older than 50.

Why is that?

Read more. [Image: Luke Hayfield, Creative Commons ]

Reblogged from The Atlantic
April 17th, 2014
themodernworld
April 17th, 2014
themodernworld

futurist-foresight:

A graphic look at the aging of the US population.

shortformblog:

pewresearch:

As Business Insider put it, “Watch America age 110 years in one gif.”

See more on the demographic transformation of The Next America here

Anyone else find it intriguing that there will be more people over the age of 85 in 2060 than there will be people in their late 70s?

Reblogged from Applied Technotopia
Evidence of change.

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